Almost half of the people who live in New Mexico are Hispanic or Latino. When the coronavirus impacted our state, it also hit the immigrant community.Congresswoman Melanie Stansbury said, “While the pandemic has forced many of our families to stay home our immigrant workers, our immigrant communities have stepped up for New Mexico they have showed up to work.” Immigrant groups like Somos un Pueblo Unido, NM CAFé, and EL CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos are organizing actions to push for a path to citizenship.District 3 Bernalillo County Commissioner, Adriann Barboa said, “We cannot have a full economic recovery from COVID in this nation if we simultaneously continue to exclude a large segment of workers and their families.” Several local and state democratic leaders are backing the effort to push congress to include citizenship in President Joe Biden’s “Build Back Better Act.” The Republican Party of New Mexico sent a statement that says in part: “It’s imperative that migrants come into this country legally. Hundreds of thousands are crowding the southern border and then crossing into this country. They are being dispersed without proper checks. There is no proper vetting, no thorough health checks, no guaranteed vaccinations, no proper identification checks, no masks and no proper visas…” Lucy Hernandez is part of EL CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos she said, “We will never stop fighting and it’s important that we have leaders in Washington who also fight for the legalization of essential workers and their families.” Hernandez says when she started advocating she knew it was her calling. She said, “I wanted to get involved after seeing injustices that would happen in the immigrant community of seeing families being separated.” Hernandez says her own family suffered by being separated, that is one of many reasons she raises her voice. “We will not rest a single day in the search for a path to citizenship for our working women just as we have not rested a single day from working through this pandemic,” Hernandez said.She has been living in Albuquerque for over 20 years, she’s originally from the state of Chihuahua in Mexico. Hernandez said, “I’d like to see that there’s fair laws and that all of us are treated as humans regardless of ethnicity.”

Almost half of the people who live in New Mexico are Hispanic or Latino.

When the coronavirus impacted our state, it also hit the immigrant community.

Congresswoman Melanie Stansbury said, “While the pandemic has forced many of our families to stay home our immigrant workers, our immigrant communities have stepped up for New Mexico they have showed up to work.”

Immigrant groups like Somos un Pueblo Unido, NM CAFé, and EL CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos are organizing actions to push for a path to citizenship.

District 3 Bernalillo County Commissioner, Adriann Barboa said, “We cannot have a full economic recovery from COVID in this nation if we simultaneously continue to exclude a large segment of workers and their families.”

Several local and state democratic leaders are backing the effort to push congress to include citizenship in President Joe Biden’s “Build Back Better Act.”

The Republican Party of New Mexico sent a statement that says in part:

“It’s imperative that migrants come into this country legally. Hundreds of thousands are crowding the southern border and then crossing into this country. They are being dispersed without proper checks. There is no proper vetting, no thorough health checks, no guaranteed vaccinations, no proper identification checks, no masks and no proper visas…”

Lucy Hernandez is part of EL CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos she said, “We will never stop fighting and it’s important that we have leaders in Washington who also fight for the legalization of essential workers and their families.”

Hernandez says when she started advocating she knew it was her calling.

She said, “I wanted to get involved after seeing injustices that would happen in the immigrant community of seeing families being separated.”

Hernandez says her own family suffered by being separated, that is one of many reasons she raises her voice.

“We will not rest a single day in the search for a path to citizenship for our working women just as we have not rested a single day from working through this pandemic,” Hernandez said.

She has been living in Albuquerque for over 20 years, she’s originally from the state of Chihuahua in Mexico.

Hernandez said, “I’d like to see that there’s fair laws and that all of us are treated as humans regardless of ethnicity.”

(this story/news/article has not been edited by PostX News staff and is published from a syndicated feed)

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