The Jackson Women’s Health Organization isn’t just the state’s last abortion clinic, it’s also at the center of an upcoming case in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. It’s a case that both sides believe could dramatically reshape access to abortion services nationwide, and potentially overturn Roe v. Wade.”I think this is, has got to be, the most unjust thing that has, that has been done to women,” said Shannon Brewer, clinic director for Jackson Women’s Health Organization. “This and SB 8. I think they’ve gone too far. I really do.”Brewer has been working at the clinic in Fondren for 20 years. She’s been the clinic director since 2010.”The new Texas law is not deterring people from getting an abortion,” Brewer said. “We’ve been even busier because now we’re seeing even a lot more patients from Texas. We’ve almost doubled our capacity. Our phones are ringing nonstop because of this.”A new Texas law banning abortion after six weeks is pushing women to leave the state and travel hundreds of miles to get the procedure. Including 21-year-old college student Madi, whose journey from Texas to the Jackson clinic was recently profiled by ABC’s “Nightline.””I am 13 weeks pregnant right now and I’m not in a place to have a baby,” Madi told Nightline. “I have graduation to look forward to. I have me trying to start my whole career and my entire life ahead of me. And my life is on hold right now.”Madi said she was in a committed relationship and using birth control, but she still got pregnant.”I took one test and it came out a clear pus sign from the beginning. I was devastated. I was shocked and I didn’t really believe it. So, then I went and got another one,” Madi said. “Then I called a friend and I was like, ‘I need you to go get me more.’ And all came out positive.”Madi said she called close to 30 clinics in several states. The Jackson clinic was the first with an appointment available. Madi said she didn’t realize the significance of the Mississippi clinic.”I honestly didn’t find out until a few days ago from now, after I’d already visited, when a friend said, ‘Did you know that that’s the only clinic in Mississippi that’s performing abortions,'” Maddie said.The 2018 Mississippi law bans most abortions after 15 weeks, except for medical emergencies, or if the fetus has a severe abnormality. The law makes no exception for rape or incest and punishes doctors who do not follow its guidelines.”Oral arguments are going to occur the first week in December. Myself, and a lot of people around our state, around this country, have been praying for this opportunity,” Gov. Tate Reeves said in a Sept. 29 news briefing. Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch responded in a briefing to the U.S. Supreme Court this week that she says underscores the need to overturn Roe v. Wade.”Every single year, and every single time we have more technology, it argues for the fact that those babies are alive and they are, they really need to be protected,” Reeves said.”My decision hasn’t wavered. It’s my body and it’s my choice,” Madi said. “I don’t think it’s right for people to try and convince others when it’s not their life that’s about to change.”The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in the Mississippi abortion case Dec. 1.

The Jackson Women’s Health Organization isn’t just the state’s last abortion clinic, it’s also at the center of an upcoming case in front of the U.S. Supreme Court.

It’s a case that both sides believe could dramatically reshape access to abortion services nationwide, and potentially overturn Roe v. Wade.

“I think this is, has got to be, the most unjust thing that has, that has been done to women,” said Shannon Brewer, clinic director for Jackson Women’s Health Organization. “This and SB 8. I think they’ve gone too far. I really do.”

Brewer has been working at the clinic in Fondren for 20 years. She’s been the clinic director since 2010.

“The new Texas law is not deterring people from getting an abortion,” Brewer said. “We’ve been even busier because now we’re seeing even a lot more patients from Texas. We’ve almost doubled our capacity. Our phones are ringing nonstop because of this.”

A new Texas law banning abortion after six weeks is pushing women to leave the state and travel hundreds of miles to get the procedure. Including 21-year-old college student Madi, whose journey from Texas to the Jackson clinic was recently profiled by ABC’s “Nightline.”

“I am 13 weeks pregnant right now and I’m not in a place to have a baby,” Madi told Nightline. “I have graduation to look forward to. I have me trying to start my whole career and my entire life ahead of me. And my life is on hold right now.”

Madi said she was in a committed relationship and using birth control, but she still got pregnant.

“I took one test and it came out a clear pus sign from the beginning. I was devastated. I was shocked and I didn’t really believe it. So, then I went and got another one,” Madi said. “Then I called a friend and I was like, ‘I need you to go get me more.’ And all came out positive.”

Madi said she called close to 30 clinics in several states. The Jackson clinic was the first with an appointment available. Madi said she didn’t realize the significance of the Mississippi clinic.

“I honestly didn’t find out until a few days ago from now, after I’d already visited, when a friend said, ‘Did you know that that’s the only clinic in Mississippi that’s performing abortions,'” Maddie said.

The 2018 Mississippi law bans most abortions after 15 weeks, except for medical emergencies, or if the fetus has a severe abnormality. The law makes no exception for rape or incest and punishes doctors who do not follow its guidelines.

“Oral arguments are going to occur the first week in December. Myself, and a lot of people around our state, around this country, have been praying for this opportunity,” Gov. Tate Reeves said in a Sept. 29 news briefing.

Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch responded in a briefing to the U.S. Supreme Court this week that she says underscores the need to overturn Roe v. Wade.

“Every single year, and every single time we have more technology, it argues for the fact that those babies are alive and they are, they really need to be protected,” Reeves said.

“My decision hasn’t wavered. It’s my body and it’s my choice,” Madi said. “I don’t think it’s right for people to try and convince others when it’s not their life that’s about to change.”

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in the Mississippi abortion case Dec. 1.

(this story/news/article has not been edited by PostX News staff and is published from a syndicated feed)

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