National party committees are already setting their calendars for the 2024 presidential nomination. Republicans have made it clear that they plan to keep the Iowa caucuses first. But it could be an uphill battle for Iowa Democrats.Changing the nomination calendar is not an easy or straightforward process. It would go against Iowa law that requires both parties to hold their caucuses at least eight days prior to any other state’s primary or caucus. Despite complexities, several high profile Democrats — including former Democratic National Committee chair Tom Perez — have spoken out against the Iowa caucuses’ first in the nation status. KCCI Political Analyst Dennis Goldford says many have made the argument that Iowa lacks diversity. Complicated caucus procedures make it difficult for everyone to participate. Goldford also said that the 2020 Iowa caucuses’ chaotic ending, when results were significantly delayed, makes it even more difficult for Iowa to defend its position.”Outside of Iowa and New Hampshire, the other states don’t really like this situation,” Goldford said. “But until they can agree on a process and an order to replace what we now have, Iowa and New Hampshire remain where they are by default.”Both Iowa Republicans and Iowa Democrats say they’ll fight to keep the caucuses first on the calendar.In a statement to KCCI, Iowa Democratic Party Chair Ross Wilburn said, “Let me be clear, I am going to continue to fight for Iowa’s first in the nation status. I believe Democratic candidates have a real opportunity in Iowa to connect with a diverse electorate that includes voters of color and rural working class Americans. Iowa also provides the perfect grassroots opportunity for candidates who don’t have the name recognition or funding to break through in larger states.””Iowa Democrats and Republicans don’t agree on much, but we do agree in keeping Iowa first in the nation. I have had conversations with Republican Party of Iowa Chair Jeff Kaufmann and will continue to be in communication with him going forward,” Wilburn said. Republican Party of Iowa Communications Director Kollin Crompton also defended the caucuses in a statement to KCCI that said, “No one has worked harder to preserve Iowa’s First in the Nation Status than the Iowa GOP, led by Chairman Jeff Kaufmann.””Kaufmann has been having productive conversations with Republican leaders from across the country and was recently appointed as the Chair of the Presidential Nominating Process Committee for the Republican National Committee. He also continues to work closely with Iowa Democratic Party leaders to protect the Iowa Caucuses,” Crompton said. Goldford said decisions on this aren’t likely to be made until late winter or early spring of 2022.

National party committees are already setting their calendars for the 2024 presidential nomination. Republicans have made it clear that they plan to keep the Iowa caucuses first. But it could be an uphill battle for Iowa Democrats.

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Changing the nomination calendar is not an easy or straightforward process. It would go against Iowa law that requires both parties to hold their caucuses at least eight days prior to any other state’s primary or caucus.

Despite complexities, several high profile Democrats — including former Democratic National Committee chair Tom Perez — have spoken out against the Iowa caucuses’ first in the nation status.

KCCI Political Analyst Dennis Goldford says many have made the argument that Iowa lacks diversity. Complicated caucus procedures make it difficult for everyone to participate. Goldford also said that the 2020 Iowa caucuses’ chaotic ending, when results were significantly delayed, makes it even more difficult for Iowa to defend its position.

“Outside of Iowa and New Hampshire, the other states don’t really like this situation,” Goldford said. “But until they can agree on a process and an order to replace what we now have, Iowa and New Hampshire remain where they are by default.”

Both Iowa Republicans and Iowa Democrats say they’ll fight to keep the caucuses first on the calendar.

In a statement to KCCI, Iowa Democratic Party Chair Ross Wilburn said, “Let me be clear, I am going to continue to fight for Iowa’s first in the nation status. I believe Democratic candidates have a real opportunity in Iowa to connect with a diverse electorate that includes voters of color and rural working class Americans. Iowa also provides the perfect grassroots opportunity for candidates who don’t have the name recognition or funding to break through in larger states.”

“Iowa Democrats and Republicans don’t agree on much, but we do agree in keeping Iowa first in the nation. I have had conversations with Republican Party of Iowa Chair Jeff Kaufmann and will continue to be in communication with him going forward,” Wilburn said.

Republican Party of Iowa Communications Director Kollin Crompton also defended the caucuses in a statement to KCCI that said, “No one has worked harder to preserve Iowa’s First in the Nation Status than the Iowa GOP, led by Chairman Jeff Kaufmann.”

“Kaufmann has been having productive conversations with Republican leaders from across the country and was recently appointed as the Chair of the Presidential Nominating Process Committee for the Republican National Committee. He also continues to work closely with Iowa Democratic Party leaders to protect the Iowa Caucuses,” Crompton said.

Goldford said decisions on this aren’t likely to be made until late winter or early spring of 2022.

(this story/news/article has not been edited by PostX News staff and is published from a syndicated feed)

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