More than 10,000 Deere & Co. workers went on strike after negotiators couldn’t deliver a new agreement. In a statement, The United Auto Workers said “members struck at midnight October 14, after the company failed to present an agreement that met our members’ demands and needs.” The vast majority of the union rejected a contract offer earlier this week that would have delivered 5% raises to some workers and 6% raises to others. Thirty-five years have passed since the last major Deere strike, but workers are emboldened to demand more this year after working long hours throughout the pandemic and because companies are facing worker shortages.Iowa workers are picketing in Ankeny, Ottumwa, Waterloo and Dubuque.JOHN DEERE STATEMENTJohn Deere released the following statement: “John Deere is committed to a favorable outcome for our employees, our communities, and everyone involved,” said Brad Morris, vice president of labor relations for Deere & Company. “We are determined to reach an agreement with the UAW that would put every employee in a better economic position and continue to make them the highest paid employees in the agriculture and construction industries. We will keep working day and night to understand our employees’ priorities and resolve this strike, while also keeping our operations running for the benefit of all those we serve.”UNION DEMANDSThe workers at the Ankeny, Iowa, plant are asking John Deere for a raise and better retirement benefits. Charlie Wishman, the president of the Iowa Federation of Labor, spoke with KCCI on Wednesday. He gave us some insight into why UAW members chose this path.”They’re going on strike. They’re not going to be paid, but the hope is that down the road that they are going to have a bigger share of the wealth they helped those companies create,” Wishman said.John Deere is expected to post record profits this year. The average production worker at Deere made about $60,000 last year but could see up to $72,000 by the end of negotiations.HARVEST IMPACTFarmers say their future is uncertain as those John Deere workers go on strike.One Linn County farmer told KCRG the impact goes beyond workers, stockholders and the company. If they don’t have a part that’s usually in stock, the harvest season could come to a halt. “If you can’t get it from John Deere because of the strike, that could become a real issue for somebody. They could be going from working to sitting and waiting for parts,” John Airy said.Airy said he isn’t worried about the harvest season for himself since he has another working combine, but he says other farmers aren’t in the same position.CONTINUING COVERAGECheck the KCCI Breaking News and Weather App for updates on this developing story.The Associated Press contributed to this report.

More than 10,000 Deere & Co. workers went on strike after negotiators couldn’t deliver a new agreement.

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In a statement, The United Auto Workers said “members struck at midnight October 14, after the company failed to present an agreement that met our members’ demands and needs.”

The vast majority of the union rejected a contract offer earlier this week that would have delivered 5% raises to some workers and 6% raises to others.

Thirty-five years have passed since the last major Deere strike, but workers are emboldened to demand more this year after working long hours throughout the pandemic and because companies are facing worker shortages.

Iowa workers are picketing in Ankeny, Ottumwa, Waterloo and Dubuque.

JOHN DEERE STATEMENT

John Deere released the following statement:

“John Deere is committed to a favorable outcome for our employees, our communities, and everyone involved,” said Brad Morris, vice president of labor relations for Deere & Company. “We are determined to reach an agreement with the UAW that would put every employee in a better economic position and continue to make them the highest paid employees in the agriculture and construction industries. We will keep working day and night to understand our employees’ priorities and resolve this strike, while also keeping our operations running for the benefit of all those we serve.”

UNION DEMANDS

The workers at the Ankeny, Iowa, plant are asking John Deere for a raise and better retirement benefits.

Charlie Wishman, the president of the Iowa Federation of Labor, spoke with KCCI on Wednesday. He gave us some insight into why UAW members chose this path.

“They’re going on strike. They’re not going to be paid, but the hope is that down the road that they are going to have a bigger share of the wealth they helped those companies create,” Wishman said.

John Deere is expected to post record profits this year. The average production worker at Deere made about $60,000 last year but could see up to $72,000 by the end of negotiations.

HARVEST IMPACT

Farmers say their future is uncertain as those John Deere workers go on strike.

One Linn County farmer told KCRG the impact goes beyond workers, stockholders and the company. If they don’t have a part that’s usually in stock, the harvest season could come to a halt.

“If you can’t get it from John Deere because of the strike, that could become a real issue for somebody. They could be going from working to sitting and waiting for parts,” John Airy said.

Airy said he isn’t worried about the harvest season for himself since he has another working combine, but he says other farmers aren’t in the same position.

CONTINUING COVERAGE

Check the KCCI Breaking News and Weather App for updates on this developing story.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

(this story/news/article has not been edited by PostX News staff and is published from a syndicated feed)

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